Current Members

Principal Investigator

Jonathan Viventi

Assistant Professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering
j.viventi@duke.edu

Dr. Viventi’s research uses flexible electronics to create new technology for interfacing with the brain at high resolution over large areas. These new tools can help diagnose and treat neurological disorders such as epilepsy, and help improve the performance of brain machine interfaces.

Research Scientists

Charles Wang

Research Scientist

Postdoctoral Fellows

Michael Trumpis

Ph.D. Student
michael.trumpis@duke.edu

I am an electrical engineer by training, with a fondness for timeseries analysis, inverse problems, machine learning, and open source science software. As a student of timeseries, I stumbled into electrophysiology over a decade ago and have never yet gotten over the wonder of the brain's... More

PhD Students

Brinnae Bent

Ph.D. Student
brinnae.bent@duke.edu

My passion for neural engineering stems from the caregiving roles I held at an Alzheimer’s nursing home and with Cerebral Palsy of Mideast Wisconsin. In my current role in the Viventi Lab, I am working towards advancing our understanding of the brain and neurological disorders through the... More

Ken Chiang

Ph.D. Student
ken.chiang@duke.edu

Mackenna Hill

Ph.D. Student

I have always been interested in how the brain functions. I became involved with the brain in a research setting at the University of Michigan Depression and Anxiety clinic where I worked to develop a computer training to help treat Social Anxiety Disorder and PTSD. Although I have yet to find... More

Kay Palopoli

Ph.D. Student
kay.palopoli@duke.edu

My current work in the lab focuses on safe and effective stimulation of the brain through minimally invasive µECOG arrays. Previously, I evaluated the long term reliability of many of these arrays, manufactured through varying methods with different materials. I also test and... More

Ashley Williams

Ph.D. Student
ashley.j.williams@duke.edu

My work focuses on designing novel electrode geometries and increasing the spatial density of electrode contacts of our flexible µECoG electrodes to obtain higher spatial resolution of brain activity. I am also exploring the use of materials such as Liquid Crystal Polymer and... More

Undergraduates

Claire Dong

Undergraduate Research Assistant

As a sophomore in ECE, I am interested in electrophysiology and the applications of electrical engineering in medicine. In the lab, I am currently working on fabricating μECoG electrode arrays for implantation and neural recording in rats, as well as evaluating the long-term reliability of these... More

McKenzy Heavlin

High School Student

Working through the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics Mentorship program, I am able to assist Viventi Labs while I expand my knowledge of the biomedical engineering field. My knowledge and experience in biomedical engineering is small but expanding rapidly; something that, I hope... More

Emily Ray

Summer Undergraduate Research Assistant

I am a sophomore studying Biomedical Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis joining the Viventi Lab for the summer. After working in libraries in rural Zambia, my focus within engineering shifted to providing accessible medical devices to power the developing world. I am particularly... More

Alonso Trejo-Mora

Undergraduate Research Assistant

Piqued by the evolving field of electrode development, I seek to apply my Electrical and Computer Engineering background to the improvement of electrode array development and analysis. I have begun submitting batches of electrodes to Long Term Reliability testing and learning fabrication methods... More

Megan Wong

Summer Undergraduate Research Assistant

I am a senior studying Biomedical Engineering with a concentration in bioelectricity. I am particularly interested in electrophysiology, so I enjoy pursuing investigations related to the cardiovascular system, nervous system, and the interface of electronics with the human body. In the Viventi... More